Drinking Alcohol taught me how to fly
Then it took away the sky....

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

MY FATHER-- "POP" (dVerse OLN 112)

A BLOGGER Friend posted about her father.
The few lines inspired me to bring HERE to 
dVerse Poets Pub and grille (gotta eat, too!)
one of a thousand memories of my "POP". 
Hope you enjoy it.


Steve Elsaesser, c.1968, Naples FL

He said to me..."THIS is my favorite picture"


As posted on Friend Susan Deborah's BLOG:

Yes, Dear Susan Deborah, those days WERE different. It is always so.

My father, another Steve Elsaesser, also was a story teller, from my earliest memory. It had not yet occurred to me that the blind can "see" things in a story--as in life--of which others had lost focus. AND...his stories ALWAYS changed just enough that ya didn't want to miss a single word.

After age 50, when he could no longer hear, children would flock to gather around him to listen..all ages. He always made his tales a learning experience, some morality, some memorable "bon mots" therein.

When he could neither see nor hear, he only knew children were present if they touched him. And they DID! Always, the fearlessness of children around him astonished me.  

Adults would give us a LOT of room to walk by, so they would not have to "look at" his disfigured eyes nor--OMG!--"touch" him.

Meanwhile, young people, ages 2-13 would climb all over him in the sand and water at the beach in Naples. HE LOVED IT! It seemed to me that children would and did realize (somehow) that his ("Broken eyes", they called them!) could "see" God in everything...everywhere. (His occupation: dairy farmer.)

Thanks for bringing back that memory to me, Susan Deborah!
PEACE and LIGHT!

--steveroni
September 2013

39 comments:

  1. wow...that's so moving steve - love the pic of your dad and by his smile i'm not surprised at all that children were drawn to him.. what makes me sad a bit is that he never could hear you play the violin then..?
    love that he did "see" god in everything...

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  2. Well Claudia. Thanks! He heard me as very young--practicing. That's why I was relegated to the horse barn, called "woodshed rehearsing--remember? And after he lost all hearing--couldn't even hear thunder, but could feel it--he would put his hand over the "flower-box" part of the violin, and hear vibrations. I don't know HOW that coud have been any good...but it made him smile even wider!!!

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  3. So touching Steve--children see God much more easily--especially in others--than we adults do--

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    1. Children have that innocence which leaves them open to "seeing".

      When I grew up, Ego and Pride pulled together the curtains, prevented me from seeing, believing, knowing, God--or much of anything else.

      "That's the news, Mr. and Mrs. America, And All the Ships at Sea."
      --Walter Winchell, newscaster before and during WWII

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  4. What a touching story, Steve. I think sometimes that kids are much less judgmental than adults are. Children SEE what is most important. Loved this story of your father.

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    1. Yes...touching is the right description.
      Thank you, Mary

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  5. A very moving story Steve! How nice that your father could still touch children with his stories and that children were enthusiastic in his presence.

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  6. pretty cool they still gathered around him to listen to his stories....cool pic too...you look a bit different than he, but you are def a story teller sir, i can see you sitting in the round chair and my boys listening as you talk and play...smiles.

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    1. Enjoyed being there more than you know...

      Re Pop and kids: reminded me of that Peep in the bible, Jesus. Children rushed to him, prob sat on his lap, , when one of the Apostles tried to chase them away--he was TIRED, they said.

      Often my Pop was tired after 10-12 hours in the sunny summer hay fields, but ALWAYS had time for the children. Like YOU, Friend Bri! that's all they ask..some "time".

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  7. So touching and real - thanks for sharing this tomight... With Best Wishes Scott www.scotthastie.com

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    1. OK. Thanks, Mr "Writer-Teacher-Man" Scott!
      Glad you stopped by.

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  8. Replies
    1. Yup! Be cheerful, joyful, and always have time to help others, No Matter What.

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  9. Thanks for sharing those memories and bringing back a few memories I had of being a child catching bits of wisdom at the feet of of an adult considered old an useless.

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    1. Maybe that's why God allows us old folks (I'm 80) to stay on...a piece of learned wisdom might be shared with another who listens, hears.
      I'll be over to visit, Nara.

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    2. Maybe that's why God allows us old folks (I'm 80) to stay on...a piece of learned wisdom might be shared with another who listens, hears.
      I'll be over to visit, Nara.

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  10. Such a lovely person you have shared with us Steve ~ From the picture, he is full of energy and light ~ Thanks for sharing your heart ~

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    1. Thank YOU Grace, for reading commenting,
      and seeing what I saw in the story.

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    2. Thank YOU Grace, for reading commenting,
      and seeing what I saw in the story.

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  11. touching story... really... kids just love people for who they are... adults judge and pick at every little thing... in many ways most (not all) lose their *sight* with age if ya catch my drift... smiles.

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    1. For some years now I've been regaining my "sight", Anthony. Cloudiness lifts slowly, but SURELY!
      Thanks.

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  12. I love the pic, I love the story and I love your words.
    You did him good and he is smiling up above.
    Peace and love my friend.

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    1. Ayala, you make me feel so good, I tend to believe my own words, that life does never end.
      ...and, you ARE a love, Ma'am!
      Thank you so much.

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  13. A very wonderful story about your Dad... It's easy to see you paid attention to his teachings....

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    1. Thanks John. LOTS of young people were influenced by his behavior and stories...

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  14. What a dad!
    I got choked up reading this!
    You must be a proud son!
    And I loved the photo of him, a beautiful soul.

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    1. Margie.
      Yes!
      You GOT it, understood. THANKS.
      Very outgoing man, before, during, and after...

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  15. appreciate the tender love expressed for your father. Beautiful how they children saw beyond his 'broken eyes' to the beauty and wisdom of his soul and how the interaction of children to your father benefited both in love and wisdom. the love you have for your father so beautifully woven in this lovely prose

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  16. Dorianna, if ever I should write a book, I'd like for you to "do" the cover jacket. You even "paint with words" in a simple, lovely comment. <3

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  17. Dads always have a way of teaching us everything they can :)

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    1. Yup, Jyo...and sometimes it even hurts. heheheh

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  18. This brought tears to my eyes... what a sweet story.. It seems that children sometimes are better judges of humans than grown-ups.. we learn that everything not "normal" should be shunned or avoided... thank you for your terrific words

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    1. YOU know, Sir, the wonderful feeling you get when someone has been emotionally affected by something you wrote. You know it all SO well.

      Thank you!

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  19. haha...
    fallout are always there :P

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  20. Yes, Jyoti...but not confusing?
    I like your kind of humor!

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  21. Nice post, great blog, following :)

    Good Luck :)

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  22. What you first name? Thanks for stopping by here. I will check out your blog...

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  23. Wonderful story about a gifted man.

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