Drinking Alcohol taught me how to fly
Then it took away the sky....

Monday, March 18, 2013

THE LAST LETTER


Posted in dVerse
Poets Pub Tuesday

Open Link night
(OLN) week # 88




MY LAST WEEKLY LETTER FROM POP

Short Story of a MAN named Steve.
Born 1905
Cincinnati, Ohio
Sightless, age 4--1909
Farmer
Four children.
Loved children, wife, 
animals, reading, life,
in that order.

Horse kicked him in head, age 18,
totally deaf by age 50.

Perpetually smiling face—
happy, happy man!

Typed weekly (lengthy) letters
to which I responded—religiously,
in braille, also weekly,
also lengthy—grin!
We lettered for many years,
some now spotted with tears

This last one from him (pictured above),
written on Sunday March 25 1978, begins:

“Happy Easter to you all
Though the weather feels like fall.

The world itself keeps Easter Day
and Easter larks are singing.
Easter flowers are blue and gay
And Easter buds are springing.

The Lord of all things lives anew
And all His works are living too.

I spaded, (on his knees)
planted onions , lettuce and peas
until I was rained out.

Our crocus are blooming fine,
noticed buds on daffodils,
tulips still growing.
The whole world is awakening with spring.

For all of us a new birth,
even for wild animals and birds.
Had a look at pear tree.
Buds on it are growing,
tree feels very much alive…”

(Excerpts from Pop's last letter, 1978.)

The following Sunday, 
April Fool's Day
a massive heart attack
struck him breathless.
Forever.




Poem taken from this excerpt of "Last Letter"

42 comments:

  1. He really was a happy man, spiritual also. His writing is full of faith and hope. His letters are good memories to have.

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    1. Yup, ML. All what you write is true. There is another side, which from time to time I address in these posts. Guess nothing is perfect. I look on bright side, sometimes. Keeps me level!

      I'll be meeting this week to discuss my choice for pope after Francis. (So I am excused from all obligations for rest of this week???)
      Peace, Myriam.

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  2. I cherish everything my father wrote to me too. thanks for sharing.

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  3. smiles...it is so cool you still have these letters...no matter how yellowed or faded...his words make me smile...he lived life regardless you know...and that you learned braille or would take the time to type something out in braille...(is it easy to do? can you tell if you made a mistake?)...its cool steve...part of your story...

    ha i like your new pic...you old ape..lol....

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    1. Easier than learning a language! Putting together letters, either one, or several which stand for words. Using a Perkins Brailler makes it rather simple...and practice HA! There's that hateful word.

      Who wants to "practice"? We just want to play the game!

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  4. A wonderful share, yellow faded, and beautiful. His words to keep you company , to be there forever. Like Brian, I think it's awesome you learned braille. I know it was many years ago but I am sorry for your loss. The feeling of Los is always there. Hugs.

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    1. Thanks Ayala. Actually I believe braille is simpler than using typewrityer: Uses only six keys, combinations of which form letters, words, and punches indentations, which a blind Peep can read by running hs fingers over the raised dots. He always used both hands. One caught what the other missed.
      Bye

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  5. " The lord of all things lives anew
    and all his works are living too " Fabulous lines! (Not that the rest aren't) those just were pertinent to me today!
    Thanks for sharing this! Love it...

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    1. Izzy, you must realize that a comment like yours--and others here today--are what we ALL need to read. Helps me remember, "It is a "we" program, not an "I" job"!
      Hope your blessings are many today.

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  6. Thank you for shasring this story about courage and love.

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  7. Aww, Steve... he sounds like a very spiritual, insightful man despite his obstacles. I'm sure you cherish those tear-stained letters. Thanks so much for sharing this very touching piece.

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  8. oh wow steve...brought tears to my eyes...what a brave man your dad was.. and wonderful that you still have this letters...must be so special to read them again

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  9. Steve, As I read this I could feel the words through the hands of time..thank you for sharing.

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    1. "...through the hands of time." LIKE that.

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  10. the world awake with Spring
    and Pops ever awake through your words

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    1. Yes, words DO have a place here. Thanks for yours!

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  11. Love this personal share Steve ~ It's a blessing to keep the letters and hear his words once more ~ Thanks for sharing your heart with us ~

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  12. Very inspiring, and such a great real life art to share. This is priceless. Very encouraging.

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  13. What an admirable man! His adversity did not prevent him from achieving success and making his life worthy. Many people have eyes but fail to see and have hearing but do not listen. A true inspiration. And now the memory of him is a gift that keeps giving forever. Some people are so poor, all they have is money while others are rich even beyond their graves. This is beautiful, Steve. You honor him well. You are blessed. Beautiful!!!

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  14. Steve, this is so very moving. How wonderful that your father and you exchanged letters & that you have these special letters from your father. What you shared is very touching. You never know when it is your time to go. It is wonderful that your father was feeling so upbeat when he penned his last. He is an example. Thank you for sharing his actual letter.

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    1. Ya know, you just got me thinking--all of us should leave some of ourselves...well, guess we DO! We leave all these "masterpieces", our blog posts. LOL!

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  15. What a wonderful tribute to your letters!

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  16. What an amazing gift he gave to you and your family with his letters. The hole they leave upon their departure from this world to the next never gets filled, does it?

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    1. Maybe hole never filled, except by "time". My empty place is now filled--and letters are reminders of so much else, some good, some not! Just like everyoe else, I suppose.
      Nice "seeing" you again, "Talon".

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  17. Never let life get him down no matter what came to town, ouch to the kick though, that had to be an awful blow and the letters sure give you a lift that up your spirits will lift.

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    1. Pat, he practiced regularly PERSISTENCE. Told us it overcame many obstacles. On "ZEROº" mornings, only the "blind guy" could get the old John Deer to start--as six of his live-in hired hands stood around and watched. I, age six, was there.

      Just occurred to me: Wonder if the tractor name "John Deer" has anything to do with the words: "Dear John"...??? (Smiles)

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  18. My mother died when I was four so I have very few memories of my own. I was blessed by my grandmother who saved every letter and passed them to me, a gift to let me see the world through her eyes even though we could be considered strangers except for the blood line. Blessings. Your poem brought fond memories. I'll pull my treasured letters out today and spend time with my mother.

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    1. Beth, your comment is downright SWEET. At once, reading here, I was flooded with warmth...and "happy"...
      PEACE!

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  19. What a beautiful post Steve! I'm so glad you came and got me for this!! Miss your smily face, and your beautiful bride's as well. Happy Anniversary!! Hugs!

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  20. such a touching memory.... what a treasure to have those letters. thank you for sharing this last with us.

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    1. Thank you for reading, Joanna. I've been missing a lot of the Peeps--and you!

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  21. Perpetually smiling face—
    happy, happy man..
    I had a constant smile on my face from there on :)

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    1. Jo, everything about him is absolutly true--sometimes in unbelievable situations. I am so glad to publish about him, because it seemed to affect many others!

      Thank you.
      PEACE!

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  22. Steve, those letters must be amongst yourmost treasured possessions ... thanks for sharing this snippet of one with us. I guess the anniversary makes Easter kind of bittersweet - I can relate for different reasons - but the faith your father had is clear from his words.

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    1. Hey, Mr "Experiment-Peep"! Not bittersweet. On contrary, those words of love for God and the Universe say to us all that he, who died 7 days later, is a SURE top candidate for the title "Saint"...a very happy thought! Agree?

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  23. Oh my. Your father's story could teach the world a thing or two about gratitude and having an indomitable spirit. You, undoubtedly, have his same zest and enthusiasm for life. Do you remember reading, a few weeks back, a story about twin deaf brothers who were slowly growing blind? They could not bear the thought of being unable to communicate with each other, so they got a doctor to perform assisted suicides. After reading about your father, I can't help but think of all that those brothers missed.

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